Resilience

Ecosystem resilience is sometimes defined as a measure of the persistence of systems and of their ability to absorb change and disturbance and still maintain the same relationships between populations or state variables.

Source: Geogiadis, N. (2019). Enhancing the resilience of Puget Sound recovery: A path through the maze of resilience thinking. University of Washington Puget Sound Institute. 20 pgs.

Stone maze on the shore next to the ocean. Photo: Cyclist https://flic.kr/p/46AVrL (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

OVERVIEW

Enhancing the resilience of Puget Sound recovery: A path through the maze of resilience thinking

A 2019 report from the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute examines the application of 'resilience thinking' to Puget Sound protection and restoration.

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